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In his 1624 history Smith claims (there seems to be no other corroboration) to have sent this "little booke" to the Queen on Pocahontas's 1616 arrival in England. [painting; engraving] [Electronic Version] [View Images: page 11] Chamberlain, John.

11.) According to the Smithsonian (see link), "This engraved portrait of Pocahontas [was] created from life during her time in England." Rasmussen and Tilton point out that the portrayal may be "unrepresentative" because it pictures her as the Virginia Company wanted her to be seen. Rolfe explains to a patron why he left their son in England after Pocahontas died and hopes he will not be criticized for doing so: "I know not how I may be censued [sic] for leaving my childe behinde me, nor what hazard I may incurr of yo'r noble love and other of my best frends." Records Pocahontas's last words: "All must die.

the only Nonpareil of [Powhatan's] Country," is introduced later as part of a diplomatic mission regarding Indian prisoners. Editor Deane, for instance, determines the rescue an "embellishment" that never happened. 3-11.) The story of John Ortiz, of the Narvaez expedition, rescued by the daughter of the chief, an Indian princess [Hirrihigua], who argued "that one only Christian could do him neither hurt nor good, telling [her father] that it was more for his honour to keepe him as a captive" -- cited by some skeptics as a possible source for Smith's Pocahontas episode.

the Pocahontas rescue episode -- another piece of evidence for those who question Smith's veracity. The "womens entertainment" or "Virginia Maske" episode is also mentioned, but without reference to Pocahontas.

[Virginia history] [Electronic Version] Chamberlain, John.

43-59, 93-95.) Written by Smith in Virginia, this document contains the first appearance of Pocahontas in the historical record but no mention of the rescue. [Virginia history] [Electronic Version] Wingfield, Edward Maria. [Virginia history] [Electronic Version] A Gentleman of Elvas. [Thanks to Kathryn Sampeck for pointing out one of the original Portuguese versions at (1557)] [Pocahontas-like] [Electronic Version] Smith, John. Pocahontas appears here only in one sentence exemplifying Indian language that translates as: "Bid Pokahontas bring hither two little Baskets, and I will giue her white beads to make a chaine." [Virginia history] [Electronic Version] Strachey, William. Here in his history of Virginia (not published until Major's edition) he memorably describes Pocahontas as an 11-12 year-old cartwheeling "little wanton," now married to Kocoum, whose right name was Amonute -- but there is no mention of connection with Smith, who had left Virginia by this time. [illustrated; Virginia history] [Electronic Version] Vaughan, Robert. [Hakluytus Posthumus; or] to describe the rescue by Pocahontas (p. Though he includes the 1614 letters by Dale and Whitaker, he only cites three other mentions of Pocahontas from Smith: her diplomatic mission, her "darke night" rescue of Smith, and her rescue of Henry Spilman. In addition, references to Pocahontas include: her name in an Indian language example (the one listed above from Smith's ), supplying food to stave off starvation, reviving spirits with her love, making amends for injuries, negotiating for prisoners, entertaining Smith with the "maske," traveling through the "irksome woods" to save Smith from a murder plot, saving Richard Wyffin and Henry Spilman, falling captive herself, marrying Rolfe, visiting England, reunion with Smith, and death. This first depiction of the rescue, say Rasmussen and Tilton, with elements based on earlier representations of Virginia Indians, is not itself totally original, and, in turn, it stands at the head of a long line of such images, as the image gallery in the archive attests. : "She goe in, if she came forth: the blessed Pocahontas (as the Historian calls her And great Kings daughter of Virginia) Hath bin in womb of a tavern." [play] [Electronic Version] Purchas, Samuel. The reason is to visit Cleopatra, his mother's sister -- the first we hear of this name. Though conversion of a "poore, wretched and mysbeleiving people" was the climactic thrust of his justification of the colony, there is no mention of Pocahontas. In his 1869 , Edward Neill quotes a letter of August 23, 1618, suggesting that Argall has some ulterior motive in advising them that the Indians "have given the country to Mr. [Electronic Version] "Att a Great and Generall Quarter Courte Held for Virginia the 13th of June 1621." . Rolfe's rosy picture of Virginia in 1616 was obviously meant to re-energize the flagging fortunes of the Virginia Company in London on the trip that brought Pocahontas to London as well.